About Us Gallery FAQs Contact Us
Marble Designs Logo
Alkemi
Solid Surface
Natural Stone
Cabinetry
Laminate
Cultured Marble
Natural Stone
 

Natural Stone countertops are highly durable and have the natural beauty of stone. A variety of finishes are available.

Granite
Go to www.pinnacle-granite.com to view a selection of colors and stones.
Granite is the most durable, and is chip and scratch resistant. You can cut, roll dough, and place hot pots directly on granite. Because stone is porous, each stone requires special sealants. But granite absorbs the least and only requires resealing about once a year.

Marble
Go to www.pinnacle-granite.com to view a selection of colors and stones.
Because it’s smooth and cool to the touch, marble is the traditional favorite for rolling dough and making pastries. However, it lacks the durability of granite and requires sealants to be applied more frequently to prevent stains.

Limestone
Go to www.pinnacle-granite.com to view a selection of colors and stones.
Limestone is not the best choice for messy—or frequent—cooks. It offers a unique weathered look but also stains easily due to its more porous nature, so spills must be addressed immediately. But don't write it off too quickly: Jerusalem stone, a generic term for stone primarily quarried from areas around the Holy Land, is a dolomite-limestone that resembles marble but is hardier than both it and limestone.

Slate
Go to www.pinnacle-granite.com to view a selection of colors and stones.
Used for centuries to create stylish weather resistant roofs, slate's natural beauty and strength are finding their way into the kitchen. Befitting of a roofing material, slate is durable, hard and fireproof. Luckily, it's beautiful, too, making it a prime choice for homeowners seeking a countertop that will make a statement. Its low absorption rate keeps stains at bay, though you may want to seal regularly to add a further dose of protection.

Soapstone
Go to www.pinnacle-granite.com to view a selection of colors and stones.
Often referred to as "the original stone countertop," early settlers in New England relied on the durable material for their own countertops. Far from a high-maintenance top, soapstone's inert nature means acids won't etch the material, and stains can be rubbed out. Mineral oil treatment will bring out a darker, richer color. Make a powerful statement by combining with a soapstone sink.